Friday, March 3, 2017

Too Worldly to Be Holy?

Depictions of 'Secular Saints' by Brother Robert Lentz,
OFM, include this image of '21st-Century Christ.'
Before you pass on Lent again, before you dismiss it as just for people more religious than you—more holy than you: please hear me out.

If you’ve had enough of holiness, if “holy intention” for Lent agitates you, try “wholeness intention.” Leave religion out of it. Give up trying to be “holy.” Instead, ask: what small change could I make for 40 days to grow, to stretch, to love?

“Holy” has become for many of us a foreboding, off-putting word and image. As an alternative, I’ve come to think more in terms of wholeness, completeness, love. This helps me.

I have also begun to reframe “holy” in the context of daily, worldly, secular life. Laying aside halos and frescos and stained glass and liturgical rituals, I imagine “holy” in simpler, more profound daily realities.

“Holy” is the intention of a bruised-hearted person to heal and move forward, to hope and dare to love again.

“Holy” is the crazy thought and fledgling will to seek to find what one’s highest possibilities just might be.

“Holy” is the pause, the recognition, the awe for a sunrise, of a sunset, of a reflection in a puddle, of a neighbor being a neighbor.

“Holy” is the recognition of justice and injustice—and exerting one's capacities to end the latter and lift up the former.

“Holy” is recognition of earth’s abundance, preciousness, and fragility—and acting as a creative steward for its future wellness.

 “Holy” is loving oneself despite what’s been done, what’s been said, what’s not been said. Holy is being gentle with oneself and investing in one’s care.

“Holy” is loving one’s neighbor as oneself—not knowing what’s been done, said, etc. “Holy” is making room, offering support, walking with.

“Holy” is less about luminous halos and stained glass and more about daily grace and helping hands and gentle encouragement.

“Holy” is you as you are, as you were intended to be, as you endeavor yet to become, as you lean forwardly into life with love in your heart.

Give up trying to be “holy.” Leave religion out of it. Instead, ask: what small change could I make for 40 days to grow, to stretch, to love?

John Franklin Hay 
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA 
www.indybikehiker.com 
www.twitter.com/indybikehiker 
indybikehiker@gmail.com

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